Israeli war planes illegally fly over the country daily, low enough to taunt people with their own helplessness. The sonic booms, a staple of Lebanon’s soundscape, are a clear message that the country is at the mercy of Israel’s brutal war machine. This message vibrates in the bones of those that have lived and died under countless Israeli raids over civilian villages, towns, and cities. It is a strange thing being bombed from the sky while knowing that there is no air force or anti-aircraft to protect you, and that you have only the concrete of your building to shield you from one of the strongest air forces in the world. To be teased with your own death and the deaths of those that you love. How does one ever feel safe again?

Alone: Palestinian Children in the Israel Military Detention System (Video)

The above video was produced by Defense of the Children International (DCI). It depicts Israel’s methods and practices of detaining Palestinian children.

Quotes from the video:

"Since 1967, Palestinians from the West Bank have lived under Israeli Military law. This Law is different from the civil law applied to Israelis living in the same territory."

"7,500 Palestinian children are estimated to have been detained, interrogated and imprisoned within this military system since the year 2000."

The Infrastructure of Israeli Settler Colonialism (Part 1): The Jordan Valley

Since its establishment, Israel has distinguished the persons under its civil and military jurisdiction based on religion. Throughout Israel Proper and the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT), comprised of the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and the Gaza Strip, Israel applies a different set of laws to its Jewish and non-Jewish inhabitants respectively. By bifurcating Jewish nationality from Israeli citizenship, the State is able to afford demonstrable and significant privilege to Jewish persons even beyond Israel’s undeclared borders (hence the reference to Israel Proper) at the expense of the political and socio-economic well-being of its non-Jewish citizens. Within the OPT, the brunt of Israel’s policies are more severe as they are applied under a military occupation regime for which no oversight or legal redress exists. The impact of these policies is to diminish the number of Palestinians, to remove them from their original lands, and to concentrate them geographically. Within the OPT, they are concentrated into Area A; into no-man’s land within the Seam Zone between the Apartheid Wall and the Green Line; and into isolated communities surrounded by Israeli settlements and their associated military apparatus. Within Israel Proper, they are concentrated in urban townships, in unrecognized villages, and other ghettoized communities.  

In this series of videos featuring interviews with Palestinians facing forced displacement, we seek to show a glimpse into Israel’s infrastructure of settler-colonialism. 

We start with Part 1, on the Jordan Valley.

Click here to read more and scroll to the bottom for the second part of the above video.

"Twitter is important.  When there is an action on the ground, it is extremely important that people are on Twitter tweeting about it and spreading the word. The problem is that the majority decide to take that role. The balance is not quite as everyone hopes. We need more people on ground. Nonetheless, as I said before, a lot of the tweeps are active on ground. And when they tweet, they tweet from the field. 
It is human nature to have a tendency to slack off. But at the end of the day, I cannot judge the level of activity of anyone by how active they are on Twitter. And let us remember, the acts of struggle and resistance are not only the ones we see.
Sometimes actions could be so sensitive that they remain covered in secrecy during planning and after execution. Many Palestinians are in Israeli prisons now just because of this unhealthy phenomenon. Many people have full time jobs of just pointing fingers at people and deciding who is an activist and who is not, or who is patriotic and who is not. In a way, they help the occupation in trying to make actions planned in secrecy surface, and thus fail.”
—Read more of Maath Musleh’s interview with Jadaliyya

"Twitter is important.  When there is an action on the ground, it is extremely important that people are on Twitter tweeting about it and spreading the word. The problem is that the majority decide to take that role. The balance is not quite as everyone hopes. We need more people on ground. Nonetheless, as I said before, a lot of the tweeps are active on ground. And when they tweet, they tweet from the field.

It is human nature to have a tendency to slack off. But at the end of the day, I cannot judge the level of activity of anyone by how active they are on Twitter. And let us remember, the acts of struggle and resistance are not only the ones we see.

Sometimes actions could be so sensitive that they remain covered in secrecy during planning and after execution. Many Palestinians are in Israeli prisons now just because of this unhealthy phenomenon. Many people have full time jobs of just pointing fingers at people and deciding who is an activist and who is not, or who is patriotic and who is not. In a way, they help the occupation in trying to make actions planned in secrecy surface, and thus fail.”

—Read more of Maath Musleh’s interview with Jadaliyya

Situating intra-family femicide within the global economy and the feminization of poverty in the new world order makes it possible to interrogate the ubiquity of misogynistic violence in patriarchal cultures not only in Arab countries but also around the world. In its global expansion to the remote corners of the world in search for new markets and cheaper sources of labor, the neoliberal ideology of economic globalization recodes women’s labor and redefines the parameters of their mobility. Consequently, traditional gender formations themselves get disrupted as Western notions of freedom and the division of labor are negotiated and appropriated. This cultural disruption happens in complete disproportion to the deteriorating economic conditions among Palestinians. More than ever, the Palestinians are excluded from Israel’s capitalist economy, which is now increasingly outsourced to migrant workers from around the world. And the crisis of tradition and gender, in turn, is violently acted out on women’s bodies.
Infographic: Born at Qalandia Checkpoint

“‘Born at Qalandia Checkpoint’ focuses on the impact of Israeli movement restrictions on the everyday lives of Palestinians. The phenomenon of Palestinian women forced to give birth at military checkpoints peaked during the Second Intifada (2000-05). Since then, Palestinian women in remote areas have increasingly resorted to coping strategies, such as relocation in the weeks prior to delivery or giving birth at home. 
Rather than challenge Israel’s military occupation and its associated checkpoints to address these conditions, the United Nations and other agencies have opted for a ‘humanitarian’ response in choosing to support the training of midwives. While this is a necessary measure, it should not supplant the legal and/or diplomatic challenges necessary to curtail Israeli abuses. By addressing the symptoms rather than the root cause of the problem, these agencies contribute to the normalization of Israel’s ongoing military occupation.”
[Download full-size image here.]

Infographic: Born at Qalandia Checkpoint

“‘Born at Qalandia Checkpoint’ focuses on the impact of Israeli movement restrictions on the everyday lives of Palestinians. The phenomenon of Palestinian women forced to give birth at military checkpoints peaked during the Second Intifada (2000-05). Since then, Palestinian women in remote areas have increasingly resorted to coping strategies, such as relocation in the weeks prior to delivery or giving birth at home. 

Rather than challenge Israel’s military occupation and its associated checkpoints to address these conditions, the United Nations and other agencies have opted for a ‘humanitarian’ response in choosing to support the training of midwives. While this is a necessary measure, it should not supplant the legal and/or diplomatic challenges necessary to curtail Israeli abuses. By addressing the symptoms rather than the root cause of the problem, these agencies contribute to the normalization of Israel’s ongoing military occupation.”

[Download full-size image here.]

"The irony of Israel’s assertion that Gaza is no longer occupied can be best appreciated when one considers Israel’s earlier position that Gaza and the West Bank were not occupied in 1967. Israeli officials claimed that the status of these areas was sui generis because, at the time of conquest, they were controlled by but not sovereign to Egypt and Jordan, respectively. “Occupation,” according to Israel, only pertains to areas that were recognized sovereign territory of the displaced states. Hence the premise, never accepted by the international community, was: no sovereignty, therefore no occupation. Rather, Israel insisted that Gaza and the West Bank were “administered” territory. The other premise of the original “not occupied” position was that Israel could lay claim to all or parts of these lands because they compose the remainder of Eretz Israel to which the Jewish people have historic and/or biblical rights.

The motivation for projecting the notion that the status of the Palestinian territories was sui generis was political: If Israel were to accept the international consensus that it was an “occupant,” it would be constrained from permanently seizing or settling territory acquired by force. Instead, Israeli officials constructed an edifice of ornate legal reasoning to legitimize territorially expansive policies. Of course, Israel had no aspiration to assert permanent control over the Palestinian residents of these putatively sui generis territories, so the people were regarded as occupied.

The concept of sui generis territory may be fitting for some places (like Antarctica). However, it is irrelevant and erroneous in the case of territory that was militarily occupied as a result of armed conflict, as Gaza and the West Bank were. The claim that the occupation of Gaza ended in 2005, and that its status is now sui generis, should be assessed in light of Israel’s earlier attempts to legally license unilateral policies implemented in defiance of international law.”

— Read more on Is Gaza Still Occupied and Why Does It Matter? by Jadaliyya co-editor Lisa Hajjar

A state cannot simultaneously exercise control over territory it occupies and militarily attack that territory on the claim that it is “foreign” and poses an exogenous national security threat. In doing precisely that, Israel is asserting rights that may be consistent with colonial domination but simply do not exist under international law.

Remi Kanazi: Normalize This!

Bringing together a great crew of creative minds and shot throughout Brooklyn, Normalize This! tackles the multitude of ways Israel attempts to normalize its policies and whitewash its crimes against Palestinians. As an avid proponent of the fast growing, rights-based Palestinian civil society call for boycott, divestment, and sanctions, and as an artist who refuses to sign onto projects that promote a false symmetry between occupier and occupied, Remi Kanazi felt this was an essential topic to tackle. Remi Kanazi is a poet, writer, and activist based in New York City. He is the author of Poetic Injustice: Writings on Resistance and Palestine, the editor of Poets For Palestine, and an organizing committee member for USACBI (the US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel). For more of his work, you can visit www.PoeticInjustice.net or follow him on twitter: @Remroum.